Demolition

Having done the preparatory work and cleared most of my stuff out of the way it was time to get the builders in to start demolition work .

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First step was to take down the dog run fencing (as I hadn't managed to get it done before they arrived) and to start removing the asbestos sheeting from the roof.

This picture shows the rear of the outhouse with the roof removed and some of the doors and woodwork stripped out.

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This one shows the front of the outhouse with two of the 'spare' sheets of roofing we found under the roof laying in front of it. The original people who put on the roof obviously had more than they needed, so instead of taking it away they put the remainder underneath the sheets that were doing the work.

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One of the builders climbing the ladder to continue with the 'un-building' of the outhouse. Here you can see that some of the roof has been removed along with part of the back wall

The roof was supported on props during this work as the roof slab was cast into the side of the gable end wall and we definitely did not want it to fall and rip the wall down!

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Most of the roof has gone now, and a good part of the walls as well.

The concrete roof on top of the toilet will remain for the time being until the toilet is re-located to the bathroom, and then it will go as well and the walls with it.

The roof had a reinforcing mesh (badly placed at the bottom of the concrete) which was cut with bolt cutters, and the thicker reinforcing rods you can see in the picture.... we'll recycle those somewhere later.

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And the view from the front, showing the reinforcing rods more clearly.

The pile of rubble is growing now. This will remain onsite and be re-used to form the sub base of the extended driveway.... more on that to come.

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And here it is down and laying on the floor in a big heap.

Now the wall has gone I'll need to close the neighbour's garden back in again to stop his dog escaping. Luckily I have a some Heras temporary fencing to hand, so I'll use one of those.

Handily, the neighbour in question was on holiday during this phase, so there was no disruption caused to him. Due to the skill, or maybe it was luck, of the builders, only one brick escaped over the boundary during all this work anyway, the rest all landing where planned.