Kitchen

This page will cover the installation of the flooring, kitchen cabinets, appliances, and other fittings.

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Fitting out the kitchen didn't actually start in the kitchen as I began with the wall cabinets in the utility room.

Quite some deliberation took place regarding the cornice and pelmet arrangement and we eventually decided to go for a square pelmet and the chamfered cornice (its actually the same stuff, just opposite ways round). The cornice I have set back from the front edge of the doors and aligned it with the front of the cabinet itself. This gives a nice shadow line across the top of the doors (which you can't see here because of the camera flash).

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I then moved next door and fitted the left hand pair of kitchen wall cabinets. The other two are still on order so they will be put up when they arrive.

I also installed the cooker hood. The vent ducting for this goes through the wall into the utility room behind, where it runs against the ceiling, through the toilet and out of the back wall.

The plug socket for the hood is hidden behind the hood's chimney. It can be isolated from the grid switch and if it does need to be reached it is only two screws to remove the chimney cowl.

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This is in the utulity room and toilet showing the route of the cooker hood vent.

Don't worry, its not actually held together with duck tape. There are the relvant connectors under there, I just used the tape to make sure the joins were properly air tight.

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Having, hopefully, resolved the problem with the damp under the floor I could also move on with the floor tiling.

As I used 18mm OSB3 on 600mm centre joists I noticed that there was a little movement between joists that could cause the grout to crack between my tiles. It was probably only a fraction of a millimetre, nonetheless it could be seen.

To counter this I laid some 'Dukkaboard' over the OSB as a first step.

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The boards were 1200mm long so, as you can see in the previous picture, I was able to align them so the ends of the boards coincided with the joists.

This board is an expanded polystyrene core with a nylon mesh embed in a plaster layer on each side. It is lightweight and easy to cut with a Stanley knife by scoring and snapping in the same manner as plasterboard. It is actually stiffer than you think it would be, but then that is the whole point of it I suppose.

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The 10mm thick boards were laid on a bed of flexible tile adhesive as if they were huge floor tiles. And were then further fixed by using screws and special washers. The last step being to reinforce the joints with some fibreglass tape.

The manufacturer says to use adhesive with the 6mm board, and screws for anything thicker. I (as usual) have gone for the 'belt and braces' approach and done both, although I did only use half the number of screws recommended since I'd also glued them.

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Having done the preparation I could then lay the floor tiles themselves, again using a flexible adhesive.

The tiles have been given a coat of sealer (since they are unglazed porcelain) and in 3 days when this is fully waterproof I can start with the grouting.

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The tiles were all grouted, but it doesn't look too different from the picture above. There's not really much interesting about grouting tiles.

One detail is the waste pipe in the toilet and that is shown in the picture. I adjusted the length of the pipe attached to the bend at the bottom so that the top of the flange was a few millimetres below th floor level and sealed around it with the tile grout.

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When laying out for the half height wall I calculated the width required for the cabinets and then added a little to give me some 'wriggle room'.

After the plaster was applied I placed the cabinets and worked out that I had 12mm too much room. To counter this I added a couple of battens of the required thickness to the walls along the cooker side of the room. The thickness of the tiles behind the cooker will bring that forward enough to match the front of the cabinets.

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Here's an overview of that wall with the cabinets in place.

You'll notice that the right hand wall cabinets have also been added since the last picture of it and the cooker is in place.

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This is the other side of the kitchen with the cabinets installed.

The space has been left for the fridge and freezer.

That rough looking bit on the corner cabinet is my addition.

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One problem with these corner cabinets is that there is nothing to stop stuff falling through the gap between the cabinets. To rectify this I made a frame and faced it with some white hardboard to prevent this. It looks neat on the inside, this side won't ever been seen so it doesn't matter.

The other problem with these long cabinets is them sagging in the middle. My solution was a couple of extra legs that I found in the clearance bin in B&Q added to the center of the base and an extra bracket to support the centre of the shelf. Both corner cabinets have been given these modifications.

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The window wall of the kitchen.

The space in the cabinets is for the dishwasher.

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Moving back to the utility room, this picture shows that it is now almost complete.

Whilst the cabinets are the same as the kitchen ones I've used different handles to add a bit of variety.

The tape around the sink will be removed when it is fitted properly (it is only trial fitted at present, pending the plumbing testing) and the washing machine will also be added when that is done.

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Where the cabinets had been spaced from the wall I was able to do the backsplash tiling before the worktops are fitted. Here the worktop will be fitted in front of the tiles, on the other sides the tiles will be fitted above the worktops.

The picture shows the tiling complete in this area. I have carried it down behind the cooker and up to the underside of the extractor hood.

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With the gap for it prepared the cooker could be connected and slid into position.

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Here's the same wall with the worktops installed and the plinths completed.

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This is looking at the other side of the kitchen area.

The TV is mounted on a swivel so that it can be angled to be used in the kitchen or rotated to be visible from the other end of the room.

(Sorry the photo is a bit dark, it was a sunny day and the camera struggled with the contrast)

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This is the area on the other side of the half wall now that the furniture is in place.

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Back in the utility room I have constructed a unit with a couple of cages underneath and a platform on the top so the dogs can be left in here when required.

The unit is free standing so that it can be lifted out to clean the walls and floor when required.

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The sink in the utility room also had a cover made from an offcut of the worktop.

The edges were sealed with clear silicone to stop it getting damp and falling to pieces.