Pitched roof

This page details the construction of the pitched roof on the extension to the side and front of the building.

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Whilst waiting for the trusses to be delivered there's not much I can do on this.

The only activity so far is that restraint straps have been added onto the wall plates and fixed in several places down the blockwork using big thick screws.

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With the arrival of the trusses and the availability of assistance (thanks dad) I was able to move on with the pitched roof.

The trusses were lifted onto the wall plates, slid into position, and then stood upright.

The trusses were placed into clips with the main girder truss having hangers affixed in order to take the trusses to the rear.

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Having placed the trusses and added the necessary bracing we used loose timbers to construct the valley which joins the two roof sections.

Only one minor issue with this when the very first board I cut (the right hand valley board) ended up too short so I had to use one of my floor joists as a replacement. I did have to have a few attempts at some of the compound mitre cuts on the rafters though.

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Two sides of the roof will need to have an overhang so the rafter tails will need to be extended to achieve that. As one section is only 1.5m long I experimented with that area.

The picture shows the rafter tails added, notched to fit over the wall plate and the brickwork of the outer leaf of the wall. The big bit of black plastic is the eaves tray to direct the rain water into the gutter and on which the felt will sit. There is an additional batten under the front of the eaves tray to act as a tilt fillet and provide the kick up of the bottom row of tiles to match the existing roof.

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After fixing a batten to the wall the fascia and soffit were added. I have made these fairly slim as I wanted them to fit behind the line of the corbelled end rather than carrying them over the top of it.

The gutter was added onto the fascia and I just need to add the downpipe to finish this area.

The downpipe will need to go around the corner of the wall as the plan is to drop the rainwater into the gulley drain along the side wall of the garage rather than have to dig a new soakaway.

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Once the gable wall went up it was clear that the work shown in the last two pictures above was wrong and needed to be done again. So it got stripped off and I started with new rafter tails at the correct angle and new fascia and soffit with a longer gutter run.

I also placed the tiles on this section as there was a lot of messing about working out spacing and cutting to fit around the end of the flat roof. The end tiles will be placed and bedded in mortar when the rest of the tiles are done.

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Having had a bit of practice with the small rear section of roof I moved around to the side of the front roof section.

Here the rafter tails have been installed.

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The eaves trays were then added.

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With some more help available (thanks again dad) the felt and battens were put on to the remainder of the roof.

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This is the other side of the section above.

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And this is how the back looks with the felt and battens on.

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With neither of us being roofers (and making it up as we went along if I'm honest) there was bound to be some compromises.

This is the major one. when I came to put the last of the battens on the top sections it was clear that they didn't actually line up on each side of the roof.

With hindsight we should have done the left side, gone across the top, and measured down to start the right hand side so it matched....... still, I'm not taking them all off and re-doing them now.

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The third batten from the top in the picture above has been placed at an angle to average out the difference on the two sides.

Once some tiles are added I don't think it is going to look too awful and I'll be able to get away with it. There will also be the ridge tiles on top of the projecting section, so that'll help hide it too.

I'll still know it is not right....... but will anyone else notice?

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With the battens on we started placing the edge tiles and mortaring them into place.

It took a couple of attempts to get this looking right with the 'fold' in the line of tiles as the ends need to kick up over the end of the wall.

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This picture of the side of the roof shows the 'upside down' tiles that are bedded onto the top of the wall before the main tiles are mortared on top.

You can also see that I've started to build up the valley as I'm putting the edge tiles on.

The tiles in this picture took me all day to put on. There was so much messing around getting the lower tiles fixed and wrapping around the base of the gable wall and then the bottom of the valley sorted out with overhangs etc.

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More progress and I've made it up to the top with this section and added some of the ridge tiles. I've also got the edge tiles in place at the front of the roof and added the end couple of ridge tiles there (you can't see that in this picture though)

Now I can carry on and get the rest of the tiles on this side.

There shouldn't be so much messing around for this, just cutting to match the line of the valley tiles.

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With the rest of the tiles added and the ridge tiles completed this side of the roof is now done.

I thought I had enough of the plainer coloured tiles to do the whole roof, so didn't bother mixing them in with the other ones. The result is that there is a bit of a join between the two types of tiles, but I'm hoping this will weather in and be less obvious in future.

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The other side of this section has also now been completed.

I haven't gone right to the bottom of the roof as the flat roof to go above the front door will go into here and I'll need to wrap the rubber membrane up under the battens before the remainder of the tiles go on.

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When placing the tiles onto the rear section of the roof a problem became apparent where the new section joins the existing.

The tiles were not laying flat and there was a large hump where the join was.

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Looking at the battens in detail shows the reason for this. The matchstick sized original battens can be seen to be much smaller than the new battens.

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With a power planer I shaved down the ends of the new battens so they were closer to the original ones.

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This then allowed the tiles to have a much smoother transition between the two sections.

There's still a little bit of a ridge, but it is much reduced.

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This picture shows the finished rear section of roof.

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With all the tiles on it was back to the overhang to finish off.

First I added a batten along the wall to take the fixings for the back edge of the soffit board.

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Then added the fascia board, the soffit, and then the gutter and downpipe.

The downpipe drops onto the gulley drain that runs between the garage wall and the retaining wall. This will direct the water across the front of the garage to the soakaway.

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And this is what it looks like at the other end having added the closing piece and the corner.

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I have also added the gutter and downpipe to the rear section of the roof.

This downpipe also drops onto the gulley drain that runs between the garage wall and the retaining wall.