Plumbing

This page will cover the plumbing work involved in the extension build.

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The first plumbing job was to move the water feed from outside so that the floor could be completed.

I had the job finished before I thought to take any pictures, so these are all 'after' images.

I disconnected the pipe at my temporary stopcock and fed the pipe back and under the floor joists to take it through the doorway and onto the other side of the wall.

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I had removed some of the wall and excavated the floor in this area a little deeper to get the pipe under what would be the new floor in the existing house.

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I then added the copper pipe onto the stopcock.

I have retained a T piece here as it will serve for my temporary hose outlet and will eventually be used for the proper outside tap once I get to doing that.

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The pipe continues up the wall into the loft where I have added a T into the pipe which led from the old incoming feed to the kitchen tap.

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The original feed came into the bottom of the vertical pipe you can see in the left of this image. I have removed that and capped it off.

You can see where the new feed is towards the right hand side.

All of this pipework will be moved when the main house is re plumbed so it will be a bit more tidy once I have finally finished.

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Waste pipes installed in the toilet.

The pipe to the left comes from the kitchen and picks up the basin on the way, the one on the right is from the utility room.

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Looking from above you can see that I've had to angle the inlet at 45 degrees. The position of the pipe meant that I couldn't put the toilet straight into it as it was too far from the wall at the top of the picture, and it was too close to turn it 90 degrees and use a right angle bend.

If it was 50mm either closer of farther from the wall at the top I could have done either, but it is now (literally) set in concrete and also now under the tiled floor, so I had to work around what I had.

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As well as the waste pipes all the hot and cold water feeds have been installed.

This is the pipework behind the centre cupboard in the utility room. The middle pipe is the cold feed, the top and bottom are the loop for the hot water supply.

The batten to the top of the picture is to support the worktop above the washing machine.

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Having decided to install a 'secondary return' system and have the hot water circulate around the hot taps and prevent having to run the tap for 2 minutes before getting hot water I added to the number of pipes required.

One result of this is the 11 pipes that come together in the corner of the toilet where the incoming feeds are then distributed to the kitchen, utility room and the toilet's basin (there's three that are going through the wall).

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Here's a longer shot showing the basin and the pipes in the corner. The waste pipe is a 'first draft' and I'll probably re-adjust to get it neater and reduce the size of the box required to hide it all.

Pipes coming down the wall are the cold feed and the feed and return for the hot water. These then go to the utility through the right hand pipes, through the wall to the kitchen, and also to the basin as you can see. (I only noticed the front of the basin was distorted when fitting it, I'll just have to live with that for now)

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Following the pipes around the room we come to the toilet which picks up a feed from the cold pipe.

The cistern appears to have a small hairline crack that I didn't notice until it started leaking once filled.... I'll have to attempt a repair as it is rather too late to return it and this is the replacement for a previously broken in transit one anyway and I'm not sure I have the energy to deal with them.

*Update: I didn't get it to seal as the crack was bigger than I thought, however, the suppliers did replace it free of charge..... so that is now working OK.

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This is the cupboard in the utility room. Feeds for the sink tap and a connection for the washing machine can be seen.

The sink waste has been trial fitted and the taps will be connected to the isolators once I've tested the pipework and properly installed the sink itself.

I've used compression fittings here so I can remove the cupboard if there are any problems with the pipe joints behind it. (the masking tape around the pipes was to hold them in place while I checked alignment)

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It is very similar under the cabinet in the kitchen. The difference here being the addition of two connection points to act as drains. This is the lowest point in the system so it can be completely drained from here if required.

I used washing machine connectors for this rather that drain cocks as I can screw on a length of hose to do the job. I'll either remove the levers or add a stop to prevent them being accidently knocked open.

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Just for completeness here's a pic of the pipes coming into the toilet and down to the complex junction we saw earlier.

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They come in from the same location as the vent for the cooker hood so will be boxed in with that.

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This is where they come through the wall into the utility room having come in from where the cold is taken from the main feed into the house seen in the second picture on this page.

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As the hot water will be circulating through the pipes it was important that they are insulated to prevent losing too much heat and having to have the boiler fire up to re-heat the hot water tank often.

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This is something I forgot to allow for when I fitted the pipes and so I had another self imposed problem to resolve. Of course I could have re-made all the pipework and fitted them further apart to allow each pipe to be individually insulated, but that seemed like a lot of work.

In the end I got creative..... in most places the hot feed and return are the top and bottom pipe and the cold feed is the one in the middle. As the top and bottom were most important they got insulated all round by slipping the insulating tubes over them. After doing those two I slit the insulation tubes length ways into four segments and placed one segment behind the centre pipe and one in front. A length of duck tape holds these in place. The picture on the left hopefully demonstrates this.